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Socio-linguistic Borrowing in Etunọ in Akoko-Edo, Nigeria

Etuno is a dialect of Ebira located in Igara the headquarters of Akoko-edo local government area of Edo state. Etuno by migration found itself in a linguistic enclave surrounded by a dominant regional language; Yoruba, and other Akokoid languages such as Okpameri, Somorika, Uneme, Ososo, Ẹtunọ, Ikpeshi, Okpe, Akan, Enwa among others. The contact situation of Etuno and these other minority languages and dialects in the continuum, also with English and the official language and Naija (Nigeria Pidgin) as a form of regional lingual franca, accounts for the a hybridization of lexical items in Etuno. Against this background, this research therefore aims at examining the contact situation of Ẹtunọ, a dialect of Ebira language spoken in Ìgarà, Akoko-Edo local government area of Edo state Nigeria. The main objective of the work is to identify the extent of linguistic and socio-cultural borrowing from other dialects and languages within the linguistic enclave. Lexical and sentential data were elicited from selected natives of Ìgarà dominantly in a relaxed context. The researcher engaged in a participant observation to record the data conversation. The recorded data were transcribed and descriptively analysed. The study showed that there is heavy loan-words found in Ẹtunọ from English, Naija (Nigeria Pidgin) and Yoruba. This reveals a pattern of code-mixing and code-switching in the conversation of the natives. The study also showed that socio-cultural items are also borrowed which is a reflection of the socio-linguistic hybridisation among the natives in the mixed community they found themselves.

Ẹtunọ, Language Contact, Loan-Words, Code-Switching, Socio-Cultural

APA Style

Oluwafemi Emmanuel Bamigbade. (2023). Socio-linguistic Borrowing in Etunọ in Akoko-Edo, Nigeria. Communication and Linguistics Studies, 9(3), 47-53. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cls.20230903.11

ACS Style

Oluwafemi Emmanuel Bamigbade. Socio-linguistic Borrowing in Etunọ in Akoko-Edo, Nigeria. Commun. Linguist. Stud. 2023, 9(3), 47-53. doi: 10.11648/j.cls.20230903.11

AMA Style

Oluwafemi Emmanuel Bamigbade. Socio-linguistic Borrowing in Etunọ in Akoko-Edo, Nigeria. Commun Linguist Stud. 2023;9(3):47-53. doi: 10.11648/j.cls.20230903.11

Copyright © 2023 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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